The Teacher (as Designer)'s Tool Box

A teacher is a designer of learning experiences. This blog provides resources for teaching all subjects through creativity and art.

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What Does Art Mean To You?

creativeartsworkshops4kids:

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"Art means a way to freely express your creative imagination through different colors, shapes, styles, and techniques. Design means a way to break down the structure of your artwork into parts and pieces. Design is the construction, while art is the finished product of that design. Art is the emotional and mental where as design is the physical and mathematical part of an artwork"

- Vannetta Doxen

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2,224 notes

teded:

These five lines are called a staff, and a staff operates on two axes: up and down and left to right. The up-and-down axis tells the performer the pitch of the note or what note to play, and the left-to-right axis tells the performer the rhythm of the note or when to play it.
From the TED-Ed Lesson How to read music - Tim Hansen
Animation by Thomas Parrinello

teded:

These five lines are called a staff, and a staff operates on two axes: up and down and left to right. The up-and-down axis tells the performer the pitch of the note or what note to play, and the left-to-right axis tells the performer the rhythm of the note or when to play it.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How to read music - Tim Hansen

Animation by Thomas Parrinello

3,420 notes

humansofnewyork:

"It’s amazing how little ability we have to shape the lives of our children. You do what you can, but their personalities are predominantly formed by the times they live in, their friends, and other influences. Parenting is sort of like pulling back the lever of a pinball machine, and just letting the ball fly."

humansofnewyork:

"It’s amazing how little ability we have to shape the lives of our children. You do what you can, but their personalities are predominantly formed by the times they live in, their friends, and other influences. Parenting is sort of like pulling back the lever of a pinball machine, and just letting the ball fly."

2,978 notes

humansofnewyork:

“There’s no better feeling than seeing the lightbulb go on. To know that there’s a new idea in a child’s head, and that you’re the one that put it there. But if any teacher is being honest, they will tell you that there is a small percentage of students— that no matter how many times you go over something, they just won’t get it. And it burns you out. If you’re emotionally invested— and if you aren’t emotionally invested, you’re not doing it right— but if you are, it can burn you out.”

humansofnewyork:

“There’s no better feeling than seeing the lightbulb go on. To know that there’s a new idea in a child’s head, and that you’re the one that put it there. But if any teacher is being honest, they will tell you that there is a small percentage of students— that no matter how many times you go over something, they just won’t get it. And it burns you out. If you’re emotionally invested— and if you aren’t emotionally invested, you’re not doing it right— but if you are, it can burn you out.”

4,484 notes

humansofnewyork:



"What’s the most frustrating part about being teacher?""I think it’s getting increasingly difficult to convince my students that what I’m teaching is relevant to their lives. They see a world where the path to success is much more muddled, and social skills are beginning to seem more important than academics. It’s hard to instill the importance of memorization when information is so freely and instantly available."

humansofnewyork:

"What’s the most frustrating part about being teacher?"
"I think it’s getting increasingly difficult to convince my students that what I’m teaching is relevant to their lives. They see a world where the path to success is much more muddled, and social skills are beginning to seem more important than academics. It’s hard to instill the importance of memorization when information is so freely and instantly available."

897 notes

gjmueller:

"Good Job" Alternatives

Parents and teachers often say “good job” as an automatic response to a child’s action. “You ate all of your peas. Good job!” “You did a good job putting away the toys.”
A “good job” now and then is fine, but it doesn’t help children understand why what they did was good. Preschoolers need to know what they did, why it worked, or why it shows they are capable. Try the following suggestions to give preschoolers specific, detailed information that recognizes their achievements and encourages their learning.

Print/share PDF

gjmueller:

"Good Job" Alternatives

Parents and teachers often say “good job” as an automatic response to a child’s action. “You ate all of your peas. Good job!” “You did a good job putting away the toys.”

A “good job” now and then is fine, but it doesn’t help children understand why what they did was good. Preschoolers need to know what they did, why it worked, or why it shows they are capable. Try the following suggestions to give preschoolers specific, detailed information that recognizes their achievements and encourages their learning.

Print/share PDF

897 notes

hithertokt:

unlearningschool:

What good classroom management looks like.  If there’s one thing you should know about managing a classroom, it’s that you’ve got to have at least three things at the ready: your respect for your students (that you actively show them), their respect of you (which partly comes from respecting them), and a willingness to drop the almighty hammer on them (KABOOM).  
But what they don’t tell you before you start teaching is that if you can get the first two in line (mutual respect) then the kids will actually want you to drop the hammer, and will look to you for it.  They will be waiting patiently for you to step in when a classmate of theirs is out of line because at the end of the day kids want to learn.  In fact, if there’s a student in the room who is preventing every one else from learning and you don’t do any hammer dropping, they will quietly resent you at best, or hate you at worst. 
Knowing when to drop the hammer and when not to takes practice, but it’s got to be in your tool-belt.  Don’t be afraid.  Make it rain.

KABOOM.

hithertokt:

unlearningschool:

What good classroom management looks like.  If there’s one thing you should know about managing a classroom, it’s that you’ve got to have at least three things at the ready: your respect for your students (that you actively show them), their respect of you (which partly comes from respecting them), and a willingness to drop the almighty hammer on them (KABOOM).  

But what they don’t tell you before you start teaching is that if you can get the first two in line (mutual respect) then the kids will actually want you to drop the hammer, and will look to you for it.  They will be waiting patiently for you to step in when a classmate of theirs is out of line because at the end of the day kids want to learn.  In fact, if there’s a student in the room who is preventing every one else from learning and you don’t do any hammer dropping, they will quietly resent you at best, or hate you at worst. 

Knowing when to drop the hammer and when not to takes practice, but it’s got to be in your tool-belt.  Don’t be afraid.  Make it rain.

KABOOM.

(via katestewartteacher)

Filed under education classroom management management